Schedule

Events

When Subject Where Contact Detail
4/27/2010 2:36:26 PM Free trip to Europe     Subsidized trip to conference in Gardone, Italy - inquire w/webmaster for qualifications More...
10/11/2009 11:30 Sung High Mass - Msgr. Wyffels - Confessions & Rosary prior St. Michael's, Morgan   11:30 Sung High Mass - Msgr. Wyffels - Confessions & Rosary prior More...
9/23/2009 Scholarships On-line   Scholarship fund for Traditionalist Catholic formation in the southern Minnesota dioceses of Winona and New Ulm. More...
9/13/2009 11:30 Sung High Mass - Msgr. Wyffels - Confessions & Rosary prior St. Michael's, Morgan   11:30 Sung High Mass - Msgr. Wyffels - Confessions & Rosary prior More...
1/1/2009 ---web site hiatus---- ------------   More...
4/1/2005 The video "What We Have Lost... and the Road To Restoration" gives an intimate, DATE NOT SET. New Ulm Public Library Meeting Room   The video "What We Have Lost... and the Road To Restoration" gives an intimate, up-close look at the destructive and wide-spread changes that have taken place since the close of the Second Vatican Council in 1965. Plus it's about the restoration of the Traditional Latin Mass and the "Faith of our Fathers;" and it documents the groundswell of traditionalism within the Church, and how you can be a part of it...on the "Road to Restoration. More...
3/6/2005 Archbishop Flynn to appear at Latin Mass St. Augustine's, St. Paul Colin Cain Archbishop Harry Flynn will make a rare appearance Sunday at South St. Paul's weekly Tridentine Mass. "This was the normative Mass... all the way through the 1960s with Vatican II,'' said the Rev. Joseph Johnson of the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis. "Since the late '60s, it has been very rare that locally we have had a bishop participate in this Mass in some way.'' The Tridentine Mass is celebrated in Latin at 11:30 a.m. each Sunday at St. Augustine's Catholic Church in South St. Paul. The Rev. John Echert will be this Sunday's celebrant; Flynn will participate and preach. A reception for the archbishop will follow the Mass. More...
3/1/2005 CALL AHEAD, LIMITED SPACE. The video "What We Have Lost... and the Road To Rest DATE & LOCATION STILL TENTATIVE. Sleepy Eye.   CALL AHEAD, LIMITED SPACE. The video "What We Have Lost... and the Road To Restoration" gives an intimate, up-close look at the destructive and wide-spread changes that have taken place since the close of the Second Vatican Council in 1965. Plus it's about the restoration of the Traditional Latin Mass and the "Faith of our Fathers;" and it documents the groundswell of traditionalism within the Church, and how you can be a part of it...on the "Road to Restoration. More...
2/25/2005 Fr. Grams, what were your findings regarding the particulars of the Traditional DATE NOT SET. Chancery w/Vicar General   Fr. Grams, what were your findings regarding the particulars of the Traditional Mass's implementation in your discussions with Frs. Echert and Ubl? There are others who are eager to be present and see if they have more success at urging the process along at a better pace More...
2/21/2005 "In the Gullet of a Wolf" Remnant online & newspaper Michael Matt, Colin Cain RemnantOnline A moving tribute as well as a sad commentary on the situation involving Allen Cain's proper internment. More...
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Meeting Format

A meeting for the Committee for Mass Survival is as follows:

  1.  Introductory remarks (brief)
  2. Video "What We Have Lost. . .and the Road to Restoration"
  3. Graphics and charting presentation:  "What We Have Lost:  The Statistics' Tale".
  4. Reading:  "Old vs. New" briefly comparing a portion of the Old rites with the New, showing how the “updated” liturgy is based on bad history, bad theology, or simply fad and whim.  The Old vs. New comparison will vary in length, though brevity is a determining factor on what is presented.
  5. Tonight's topic.  Example:  "What possibilities exist to maintain St. Closing Church as a Traditional Latin-rite oratory?"  moderated by LOCAL PERSON.

Introductory remarks, the video, and presentation will be the same at each meeting (agenda items 1-3) and last just over one hour.  Feel free to come late if you've seen the first hour at a prior meeting.   The official agenda portion of the meeting would be short so as to accommodate peoples’ busy schedules, but the setting should be such that discussions can continue [much] later.  After all, it is during these informal after-meeting discussions that the majority of fact-finding will occur.

Who Can Come?

Everyone!  The meetings are open to the public and we attempt to have an "open" atmosphere as much as our agenda and financial resources allow.  The local parish church basement or community room is probably the best setting because it is in an atmosphere that many of the interested audience would find comfortable.  Meetings in public libraries are a good venue as is an outdoor public park in the warmer months.  Business places that could benefit from selling food and refreshments to the meeting attendees should also be considered and patronized.  Private homes are also fine, though  sometimes it might be difficult getting people to come because they would feel uncomfortable in a stranger’s house.

Further Details

As stated earlier, agenda items 1-3 make up the informational portion of the meeting.  The "old vs. new” reading (agenda item portion) makes the transition between that of an informational meeting to that of an open discussion.  This reading may also start a discussion.  Perhaps it may even turn into a heated debate, depending upon how well the ads run prior to the meeting succeeded in coaxing in people of various backgrounds and opinions.  Debate should be considered a  a good thing, because as stated in "Our Mission", we are both on a fact-finding and an educational campaign.  

The debates will serve an educational purpose when kept in check by a skillful moderator.  It will be up to the moderator to determine how long these debates will continue (short is better) and to ensure that it doesn’t end up as a shouting match.  It is also up to the moderator to cut the non-Traditionalist off if the old canards are trotted out too often.  This is not meant as a bullying tactic; there simply isn't enough time for it in a meeting of this nature.  If he has something to contribute, then let him contribute.  But if he just has the same old parrot lines, then let him close his mouth and listen and learn.  He can talk all he wants some other time and place.

The next item on the agenda is the advertised purpose of the meeting, for example "What possibilities exist to maintain St. Closing's as a Traditional Latin-rite oratory?"  Discussion should be confined to the topic until such time as the moderator senses things have run their course (usually no more than 30 minutes).  At that time, the moderator will indicate that there are food and refreshments followed by a  few summary remarks.  Those who have time are encouraged to stay later and discuss further topics with one another.

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History, Milestones, and Deliverables

Jan 1 1957 - Establishment of the Diocese of New Ulm under Bishop Alphonse J. Schladweiler.  

     

Jan 1 1975 - Bishop Raymond A. Lucker. 

    Under the reign of Bishop Lucker, the Diocese of New Ulm became well-known for its "progressive" stance on many issues, most notably on education and the advocacy of women ordination. Bishop Lucker was a regular speaker at conventions of the Call to Action group. For a small portion of documentation from this time period, see the Documents section of the Archive page.

Jan 1 2001 - Bishop John Nienstedt.

     

Jan 1 2002 - Bishop John Nienstedt "Latin. . . but new Mass only. . ."

     

Feb 20 2004 - Granted a meeting with Vicar General Fr. Douglas Grams.

    Many thanks to Fr. Grams for being very generous with both his time, attentivity, and skill in a two hour meeting with George Turbes, Greg Kodet, Stephen Groebner, and Greg Groebner.

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Last updated: March 23, 2005.